News from the Conservation Action Trust

Conservation Action Trust
 

Anti-poaching lessons from Tanzania

26 April 2016 | SA Breaking News | Don Pinnock | FREE TO PUBLISH CREDIT CAT

A multipronged Tanzanian project has reduced elephant poaching numbers by two thirds within six years. It’s a model for all Africa. When elephant poachers enter a protected area they’re armed, alert and dangerous. Back home they’re relaxed and vulnerable. That’s where an organization in Ruvuma, Southern Tanzania, hits them hardest. Until recently massive poaching was … Full Story →


 

SA rejects trade in rhino horn legalisation

21 April 2016 | Traveller24 | Selene Brophy |

South Africa will not submit a proposal to legalize trade in rhino horn to the 17th Conference of the UN Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), to be hosted in Johannesburg in September. The recommendations were endorsed by the Interdepartmental Technical Advisory Committee and an Inter-Ministerial Committee appointed to investigate the possibility of … Full Story →


 

How intelligent law enforcement in Tanzania is saving elephants

25 April 2016 | Africa Geographic | Wayne Lotter |FREE TO PUBLISH CREDIT CAT

The scale of the elephant poaching problem is immense. The global crisis is now well documented, with an estimated 30,000 to 35,000 African elephants being illegally killed annually for their ivory. Tanzania has lost by far the most, with its elephant population having declined by about 66,000 in six years up until November 2014 (Tanzania Wildlife … Full Story →


 

The effects of trophy hunting on five of Africa’s iconic wild animal populations in six countries – Analysis

January 2016 | | Adam Cruise |

Abstract The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Species Survival Commission (SSC), states “that well-managed trophy hunting can provide both revenue and incentives for people to conserve and restore wild populations, maintain areas of land for conservation, and protect wildlife from poaching.” According to a much touted study by Lindsey et al (2006), trophy … Full Story →


 

Why it makes sense to burn ivory stockpiles

23 April 2016 | The Guardian | Paula Kahumbu with Andrew Halliday |

On 30 April Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta will set fire to 105 tonnes of ivory in Nairobi National Park. This article explains why it’s the right thing to do. By burning almost its entire ivory stockpile, Kenya is sending out the message that it will never benefit from illegal ivory captured from poachers or seized … Full Story →


 

Zimbabwe National Elephant Management Plan (2015-2020)

| The Zambezi Societuy | Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority |

Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AM Area Manager CA CAMPFIRE Association CE Chief Ecologist DC Conservation Director DG Director General EM Elephant Manager HEC Human Elephant Conflict HMS Head Management Services HRM Head Human Resources IM Investigations Manager NGO Non Governmental Organisation PRM Public Relations Manager RDC Rural District Council RM … Full Story →


 

This New Map of Major Ivory Seizures Could Help Save Elephants

13 April 2016 | Takepart | Taylor Hill |

Despite scores of large-scale ivory seizures since 2000, only 18 have been fully investigated, a conservation group says. It’s estimated there are 410,000 to 650,000 elephants roaming the Earth. It sounds like a lot, but between 30,000 and 50,000 die each year, poached for their ivory tusks at a rate of one every 15 minutes—fast enough to … Full Story →

Hwange-gate-150x150.jpg
How to steal an ivory stockpile

22 April 2016 | Oxpeckers | Oscar Nkala |

Zimbabwean parks employees allegedly managed to steal ivory from the Hwange stockpile since 2012 and export it to international trafficking syndicates. One reason for the tight security around the Main Camp headquarters inside Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe is that it contains an ivory warehouse which holds more than half the country’s accumulated ivory stockpile … Full Story →

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